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Meet the Attorneys

David B. Anderson
David B. Anderson
Gordon T. Carey, Jr.
Gordon T. Carey, Jr.
Douglas R. Williams
Douglas R. Williams
Nicholas J. Neidzwski
Nicholas J. Neidzwski
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David B. Anderson, Gordon T. Carey, Douglas R. Williams, and Nicholas J. Neidzwski are proud members of the Maritime Law Association of the United States.

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Oregon

Home to the nation’s largest wheat export center in Portland, and the largest deep-water port between San Francisco and Puget Sound at Coos Bay, the maritime industry in Oregon plays an important part in the nation’s cargo operations business, with $14 billion in imports and exports moving through the Port of Portland alone each year. From work on freighters to cargo handling in ports and harbors, maritime employment in Oregon is thriving. Oregon’s status as home to one of the largest salmon fishing industries in the world, as well as the various opportunities in fish packing, ship building, the cruise ship industry, and recreational boating also contribute.

Whether you are a deckhand in Portland, a longshoreman at the Port of Coos Bay, or a fish processor on a factory trawler based out of Astoria, you know your job in the maritime industry comes with a higher degree of risk than other occupations. However, if your employer, vessel owner, or other party fails to act with a certain duty of reasonable care to minimize these risks and you suffer injury, you may have a case for negligence under maritime law. An experienced Portland maritime injury lawyer can help you fight for the compensation you need for your Oregon maritime injury.


Oregon Maritime Injury Attorney

Though the maritime industry is full of risks, it is important to consider as an injured seaman or a portside worker whether the negligence of another party likely contributed to your injury. If you are a maritime employee who has suffered injury in any of the maritime centers of Oregon, including Portland, Newport, Astoria, and Coos Bay, the experienced maritime injury lawyers of Anderson Carey Williams & Neidzwski can work with you to determine negligence on the part of your employer, a vessel owner, or other party.

Driven by their own passion for maritime pursuits and decades of combined experience serving clients like you, the experienced maritime attorneys of Anderson Carey Williams & Neidzwski know what it takes to fight for maximum compensation in your Oregon maritime injury case. To find out what Anderson Carey Williams & Neidzwski can do for you, call 1 (800) 262-8529 today and schedule your free initial case consultation.


Proudly Serving the Maritime Industry in Oregon

The experienced Portland maritime injury attorneys of Anderson Carey Williams & Neidzwski are knowledgeable and passionate about Oregon’s maritime industry ventures. They understand how maritime law can become complicated in an injury case, whether you’re a shipbuilder in Portland or a commercial fisherman on the mouth of the Columbia River.

Seamen employed by or otherwise attached to the vessels that help support Oregon’s maritime economy, such as container ships, research vessels, freighters, barges, and dry-bulk carriers,  can likely depend on maritime law such as the Jones Act or the doctrine of unseaworthiness to recover for injuries suffered on the job due to negligence of the maritime employer or vessel owner. What the seaman can claim depends on the location and cause of injury. For example, a fish processor on a factory ship in the North Pacific may have a different claim than a deckhand on a freighter at the Columbia River.

The Longshore and Harbor Workers’ Compensation Act (LHWCA) is the maritime law that most likely applies in cases of injured shoreside workers like ship builders, harbor workers, and longshoremen. Unlike the Jones Act, it is not a tort-related law; rather, the LHCWA is a form of protection that operates much like Oregon workers’ comp. The experienced Oregon maritime injury attorneys of Anderson Carey Williams & Neidzwski represent Portland dock and shipyard workers, as well as other portside employees, in cases where the plaintiff is eligible to bring a claim against a vessel owner for unseaworthiness or a third party such as a maritime equipment manufacturer.

Whether your maritime injury claim qualifies for damages under the Jones Act, the doctrine of unseaworthiness or other general maritime law, Anderson Carey Williams & Neidzwski prides itself on building a strong case negligence for your injury and pursuing maximum damages through the appropriate maritime legal venue for clients like you. Contact the experienced maritime injury lawyers of Anderson Carey Williams & Neidzwski today to discuss your recovery options if you are an injured seaman, longshoremen, or another maritime employee in Portland, Newport, Astoria, Coos Bay, or another area in Oregon.


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Strong Oregon Seaman Advocates

Because Oregon is a major center for transport of goods and cargo by sea, including exports like wheat, hay, automobiles, steel, and limestone, many seamen find themselves employed in Oregon’s maritime industry. Maritime trade in Oregon, such as that found in Portland, Newport, Astoria, and Coos Bay, supports many seaman roles, including deckhands, sailors, marine oilers, barge hands, deck officers, captains, mates, ship engineers, deck engineers, and pilots. As a salmon fishing capital, commercial fishermen, fish processors, packers, and packagers also find employment here.

These seamen are often aware of the extra risk their occupation presents to them. However, the maritime company that employs them and the owner of the vessel provided for their use have a duty of reasonable care to protect the seaman from such risk. When an injury is suffered because such care was not exercised, that could be considered negligence under the Jones Act on the part of the employer, and failure to provide a seaworthy vessel under general maritime law on the part of the vessel owner.

For example, a salmon packer on a factory processing vessel near the Port of Portland who is injured due to a failure to implement occupational safety guidelines potentially has cause to pursue damages from his or her employer under the Jones Act. A deckhand injured during cargo operations in the Port of Coos Bay while at anchor due to faulty safety equipment may pursue compensation from the vessel owner under the warranty of seaworthiness. In all cases, depending on individual factors, maritime law can be complex. The services of an experienced Portland maritime injury attorney are highly recommended to help you determine the best course of action for your maritime injury case.


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Prominent Oregon Ports of Call


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List of Important Oregon Bodies of Water


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 Anderson Carey Williams & Neidzwski | Maritime Injury Attorney in Portland, Oregon

If you are a maritime employee such as a ship builder, longshoreman, deckhand, fish packer, commercial fisherman, or pilot and have been injured on the job in Portland, Newport, Astoria, Coos Bay, or anywhere else in Oregon, contact the experienced maritime injury attorneys of Anderson Carey Williams & Neidzwski today. They will build a strong case for negligence where necessary and fight for fair compensation for your injuries under the Jones Act, the unseaworthiness doctrine, the LHWCA, and other maritime laws. Your first consultation is free, so call 1 (800) 262-8529 and schedule yours today.

This website was designed for martime lawyers and was created solely for general information purposes. Nothing on this website should be construed as legal or medical advice. Only a maritime attorney or physician licensed to practice in your state can provide you with official guidance based on the specific details surrounding your situation.

Additionally, contacting Anderson Carey Williams & Neidzwski via e-mail or phone does not create an attorney / client relationship. This relationship is only formed after a formal agreement has been made by both parties.