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The Military Sealift Command

The Military Sealift Command is the transportation provider for the United States Navy and the Department of Defense. It comprises a fleet of ships owned mainly by the Navy.

Currently, the Military Sealift Command operates approximately 125 civilian-crewed ships that replenish and transport Navy ships. Therefore, if someone is employed by the Military Sealift Command working on one of the 125 civilian crewed ships, they may be protected by the Jones Act.

Military Sealift Command Attorneys |  Washington, Oregon, Alaska, California

If you were injured on a ship that is owned or operated by the U.S. military, you may need a Military Sealift Command lawyer to help you claim the compensation you deserve. Maritime workers who have suffered injuries on the waters are often eligible for compensation, such as medical expenses and lost wages.

The attorneys at Anderson Carey Williams & Neidzwski, LLP have the experience needed to navigate you and your family through the legal process. Call 1 (800) 262-8529 to secure a free consultation with one of our attorneys. We proudly serve clients in Washington, Oregon, Alaska, and California.


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Information Center


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Eligible Workers for Damages

Damages are generally available under the Jones Act, allowing most individuals who spend at least 30% of their work aboard or in the service of a vessel in navigable waters to be eligible for Jones Act damages. Some examples of workers who are eligible include, but are not limited to:

  • Deckhands
  • Captains
  • Mates
  • ABs
  • OSs
  • Engineers
  • Stewards

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Potential Damages

An injured maritime worker may receive two categories of damages as a result of their injury: economic and non-economic.

Economic Damages

Economic damages include those that have concrete figures  and are relatively easy to calculate, such as lost earnings and medical expenses.

Lost Earnings

Lost earnings are past and future earnings that were or will be lost due to the injury. Past lost earnings are generally easy to calculate because the worker knows how many hours of work were missed and their hourly salary. However, future earnings may be more challenging to calculate because it may take into consideration promotions, bonuses, or job switches that are no longer attainable due to the injury. To determine future earnings, an expert witness is generally hired who must show that it is more likely than not that the victim would have lost the earnings being estimated.

Medical Expenses

Medical expenses are past and future medical expenses that have been or will be accrued due to the injury. Similar to lost earnings, past medical expenses are relatively easy to calculate because they have already been accrued and can be shown with an itemized invoice from the hospital or medical professional. Future medical expenses are more challenging to prove because they require estimations on what additional care may be needed. Like with future lost earnings, future medical expenses are generally calculated by an expert witness in the medical field who can point to what treatment will be required in the future.


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Non-Economic Damages

Non-economic damages are those that include compensation that accounts for pain and suffering. Pain and suffering includes the physical pain involved with the injury and the mental anguish caused by the injury. Non-economic damages may also consist of the pain and suffering of the victim’s family members, also known as consortium.

There are several factors that a court or jury will take into consideration when determining the amount of pain and suffering that will be received by the victim, including but not limited to:

  • The severity of the injuries
  • Pain and inconvenience of the injuries
  • Impact of the injuries on the victim’s life
  • Impact of the injuries on social status and relationships
  • Impact of the injuries on the victim’s careers
  • Need for ongoing care

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Consortium

The worker’s family members may seek consortium as a result of loss of care or relationship due to the injury. For example, a spouse may be able to recover  for lost consortium if the injury directly impacted their marital relationship with the victim.


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Additional Resources

Military Sealift Command – The Military Sealift Command website provides more information on the Military Sealift Command, what they do, and how many vessels they are operating at any given time.

United States Customs and Border Protection – The U.S. Customs and Border Protection website gives more information on the Jones Act and how the United States plays a role.


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Washington, Alaska, Oregon, and California Military Sealift Command Lawyers

If you have been injured on a Military Sealift Command vessel, contact Anderson Carey Williams & Neidzwski, LLP. Maritime law is complex, but the maritime injury lawyers at Anderson Carey Williams & Neidzwski, LLP have the experience to navigate you and your family through these waters. We can discuss your case and work hard to obtain fair compensation.

Anderson Carey Williams & Neidzwski, LLP accepts maritime injury cases in Washington, Oregon, Alaska, and California. Call 1 (800) 262-8529 to secure an initial consultation today.


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  • The Maritime Law Association of The United States
    The Maritime Law Association of the United States (MLA) was founded in 1899. Its formation was prompted by the organization, some three years earlier, of the International Maritime Committee.
  • Washington State Bar Association
    The Washington State Bar Association operates under the delegated authority of the Washington Supreme Court to license the state's nearly 40,000 lawyers and other legal professionals.
  • Oregon State Bar
    The Oregon State Bar is a government agency in the U.S. state of Oregon. Founded in 1890 as the private Oregon Bar Association, it became a public entity in 1935 that regulates the legal profession.
  • Alaska Bar Association
    The Alaska Bar Association is a mandatory bar association responsible to the Alaska Supreme Court for the admission and discipline process of attorneys for the State of Alaska.