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Crush Injuries

Maritime workers are more susceptible to crush injuries that everyday citizens. Such professionals spend their days surrounded by heavy equipment and machinery, placing them at risk for crush injuries on a daily basis.

Victims of crush injuries can suffer severe medical conditions, permanent disability, and in some cases, death. You should not be left paying out of pocket for crush injuries sustained as a maritime worker. Contact a maritime lawyer who can help you recover the compensating you’re entitled to.

Crush Injuries Maritime Attorney in Oregon, Washington, California and Alaska

The party responsible for your crush injuries should be held accountable for the pain they have caused. Anderson Carey Williams & Neidzwski, PLLC has over 40 years of experience helping maritime workers like you receive the compensation needed for a full recovery.

Call 1 (800) 262-8529 to schedule a confidential consultation.  Anderson Carey Williams & Neidzwski, PLLC represents maritime workers in states along the West Coat including Oregon, Washington, California and Alaska. 


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Maritime Crush Injuries

A crush injury is a result of compressing force to the body. Depending on the weight of force, organs can be ruptured, blood vessels could burst and bones could be broken or fractured. Most equate crush injuries with fallen objects, but the injury can occur out of unexpected causes such as defective equipment and heavy doors.

You have the right to compensation for your crush injuries, especially if the injury was the result of an employer’s negligence or an unseaworthy ship.  Anderson Carey Williams & Neidzwski, PLLC can help you recover compensating for the following damages:

  • Initial and ongoing medical costs
  • Loss of wages
  • Pain and suffering
  • Mental anguish

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The Dangers of Vessel Doors

Vessels at sea experience dangerous weather conditions. This causes the ship to sway from side to side resulting in doors continually opening and closing. To combat the issue of slamming doors, many vessels are equipped with hydraulic and automated doors.

In addition to preventing the doors from slamming open and closed, hydraulic and automated doors are also designed to save lives in the event of a hull breach. Hydraulic and automated doors may have been designed with safety in mind, but they can cause severe crush injuries due to their force.

In a notable case involving Royal Caribbean, various employees sued the cruise line after their hands were crushed in an automatic watertight sliding door. One victim’s injuries were so severe she lost mobility and proper use of her right hand.

Because of the sheer force of hydraulic and automated doors, crush accidents involving the device can also result in death. It’s advised you contact a maritime attorney if you have lost a loved one to a maritime crush accident.


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What Maritime Law Covers my Crush Injuries?

Injured maritime workers have a right to compensation for their injuries. How you recover damages will depend on where the injury took place. Most injuries or deaths that took place while working at sea are covered under the Jones Act.

The Jones Act is a form of workers’ compensation for maritime workers injured at sea on certain vessels. The only stipulation is you must prove your status as a seaman. You can prove this status by demonstrating you have employment-related connections to the vessel and you contributed to the mission or operation of the vessel.

Under the Jones Act, you will be awarded maintenance and cure. Maintenance is the cost of everyday living expenses while cure covers necessary medical costs. Maintenance and cure are a right, not a privilege, but employers are known to avoid making payments or undercut payments for injured maritime workers. If this is the case for you, contact a maritime lawyer immediately.

The Jones Act is not the only maritime law your injuries may fall under. You may be able to recover damages under the Public Vessels Act or the Longshore and Harbor Workers’ Compensation Act, to name a few. An experienced maritime lawyer can help you decide which maritime laws apply to you.


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Additional Resources for Crush Injuries

Watertight Bulkhead Doors | U.S. Code – Follow the link provided to read the regulations for watertight doors on vessels. You can learn about where such doors should be located, how they should be designed and necessary warning lights. The code can be read on the official website of Cornell Law School.

The Jones Act – Read through one of the maritime laws your crush injuries may be eligible under, the Jones Act. Jump to section 33 to learn about compensation under the act. You can also learn about the requirements of good shipped between U.S. ports and other legislation related to maritime commerce.


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Crush Injury Maritime Lawyer in Oregon, Washington, California and Alaska

Contact Anderson Carey Williams & Neidzwski, PLLC if you’re having a difficult time obtaining the funds you need to recover from crush injuries. We will aggressively fight to ensure you recover the compensation you are entitled to.

Anderson Carey Williams & Neidzwski, PLLC is here to answer any question you have regarding maritime law. Call 1 (800) 262-8529 to schedule a confidential consultation. We represent injured maritime workers in Oregon, Washington, California and Alaska.


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Client Testimonials

  • The Maritime Law Association of The United States
    The Maritime Law Association of the United States (MLA) was founded in 1899. Its formation was prompted by the organization, some three years earlier, of the International Maritime Committee.
  • Washington State Bar Association
    The Washington State Bar Association operates under the delegated authority of the Washington Supreme Court to license the state's nearly 40,000 lawyers and other legal professionals.
  • Oregon State Bar
    The Oregon State Bar is a government agency in the U.S. state of Oregon. Founded in 1890 as the private Oregon Bar Association, it became a public entity in 1935 that regulates the legal profession.
  • Alaska Bar Association
    The Alaska Bar Association is a mandatory bar association responsible to the Alaska Supreme Court for the admission and discipline process of attorneys for the State of Alaska.