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Factory Trawler Accidents

Fish processors and others working on factory trawlers have hazardous jobs, even compared to other maritime professions. Factory trawler accidents can cause serious injuries, including:

  • Death
  • Electrocution
  • Paralysis
  • Burns
  • Strangulation
  • Crushed or shattered bones
  • Major cuts
  • Avulsion injuries
  • Trauma to the head, neck, or back
  • Loss of limbs

If you have suffered injuries in a factory trawler accident, contact Anderson Carey Williams & Neidzwski, LLP. Our attorneys can help you navigate these difficult times and recover the compensation you are entitled to.

Washington, Alaska, Oregon, and California Factory Trawler Accident Lawyers

If you have been injured in a factory trawler accident, you should seek a qualified maritime lawyer that can represent you in your case. Under the Jones Act and general maritime law, you may be entitled to recover compensation for your injury if it was caused by defective equipment or the negligence of an employer. Anderson Carey Williams & Neidzwski, LLP can help you secure the damages you need to recover financially.

For a free consultation with Anderson Carey Williams & Neidzwski, LLP, call 1 (800) 262-8529. We serve clients in Washington, Alaska, Oregon, and California.


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Potential Causes of Injuries from Factory Trawler Accidents

Injuries from factory trawler accidents may be caused in a variety of ways. Some potential causes are:

  • Improper assembly or calibration of the factory trawler or other machinery/equipment used in the operation of the factory trawler
  • Defective systems in the factory trawler or other machinery
  • Improper maintenance of the factory trawler or other machinery/equipment
  • Mechanical failures of the factory trawler or other machinery/equipment
  • Excessive speed of the factory trawler or other machinery/equipment
  • Equipment overload
  • Safety equipment for the factory trawler not provided or otherwise inadequate for the job
  • Fatigued or overly tired employees operating the factory trawler or other equipment
  • Lighting not sufficient for safe operation of the factory trawler
  • Poor training related to the use and safety of the factory trawler
  • Not enough people working on the factory trawler to create a safe environment
  • The factory trawler or other equipment not safely and adequately secured

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Compensation for Injuries from a Factory Trawler Accident

Depending on case specifics, multiple avenues to compensation might be available to an individual injured in a factory trawler accident.

Maintenance And Cure

If an individual is injured by a factory trawler, one possible source of compensation may be the common law concept of maintenance and cure. This doctrine requires employers to compensate injured seaman by paying for their basic expenses while they heal (maintenance) and medical expenses (cure).

The Jones Act

Another possible source of compensation may be the Merchant Marine Act of 1920, also known as the Jones Act, which allows an injured seaman to bring a claim for an injury caused by their employer’s negligence and have trial by jury. If the negligence of an employer or a crew member contributed at all to the injury, a claim may be brought under the Jones Act, even if the contribution was minimal. In a case filed under the Jones Act, an injured individual may seek damages for lost earnings, lost earning capacity, medical expenses (past, present, and future), pain and suffering (past, present, and future), and mental anguish (past, present, and future).

Unseaworthiness

The doctrine of unseaworthiness holds that if a ship (such as a factory trawler) is not seaworthy, the ship’s owner may be liable for any injuries that occur on the ship.

The Longshore and Harbor Workers’ Compensation Act

If an individual is injured working on a factory trawler or in proximity to a factory trawler while unloading or repairing the vessel and the individual is not a seaman (e.g., they are a longshoreman or harbor worker), they may be entitled to compensation under the Longshore and Harbor Workers’ Compensation Act (LHWCA) from their employer  They may have a third party lawsuit for damages against the vessel.

The Death on The High Seas Act

If an individual’s spouse, parent, or child died while working on a factory trawler at sea, they may be entitled to compensation under the Death on the High Seas Act. This federal law requires negligence or a wrongful act against the victim for the individual to recover.


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Statute Of Limitations (SOL)

  • Maintenance and cure: 3 years
  • Jones Act: 3 years
  • Doctrine of unseaworthiness: 3 years
  • LHWCA: 1 year for comp claims from the employer and 3 years for negligence claims against the vessel
  • Death on the High Seas Act: 3 years

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Additional Resources

OSHA Fall Protection Guide – A fall protection safety fact sheet provided by OSHA.

OSHA Standards for Marine Equipment – To learn more about standards for marine equipment, the United States Department of Labor Occupational Safety and Health Administration has released a brochure.


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Factory Trawler Accident Attorneys |  Washington, Oregon, Alaska, California

If you or a loved one were injured in a factory trawler accident, the maritime lawyers at Anderson Carey Williams & Neidzwski, LLP know what it takes to achieve a successful outcome. We can determine the source of the negligence and secure optimal compensation for your injuries. With over two decades of experience in maritime law, our attorneys can build a successful legal strategy for your case.

To schedule your first consultation with Anderson Carey Williams & Neidzwski, LLP, call 1 (800) 262-8529. We frequently litigate in Washington, California, Alaska, and Oregon and represent clients nationwide.


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  • The Maritime Law Association of The United States
    The Maritime Law Association of the United States (MLA) was founded in 1899. Its formation was prompted by the organization, some three years earlier, of the International Maritime Committee.
  • Washington State Bar Association
    The Washington State Bar Association operates under the delegated authority of the Washington Supreme Court to license the state's nearly 40,000 lawyers and other legal professionals.
  • Oregon State Bar
    The Oregon State Bar is a government agency in the U.S. state of Oregon. Founded in 1890 as the private Oregon Bar Association, it became a public entity in 1935 that regulates the legal profession.
  • Alaska Bar Association
    The Alaska Bar Association is a mandatory bar association responsible to the Alaska Supreme Court for the admission and discipline process of attorneys for the State of Alaska.